Sunday, November 29, 2015

Biking Down the Rhine: Continuation of Day 3: Worms

After biking 37 miles from Mainz we finally arrived at Worms.  As if we weren't already seat sore, the bridge above was quite steep.  Originally there was a wall around the town to protect the townsfolk from invaders.  The wall is mostly gone but the stone entrance-way at the apex of the bridge is still intact.

The tower and surrounding building above is all that is left of the original Medieval wall that once circled Worms.  It is now a museum about the Epic story of the Nibelungenlied. 

I read the Medieval Saga on my Kindle in the evening after dinner on the boat.  You can read my review here.

This is a wonderful museum that gives the history of this legend of Tristan and the Rhine gold.  The reason for the museum in Worms is because legend has it that it was at Worms where the gold was dumped in the Rhine.  The museum also has footage of Fritz Lang's silent films, Tristam and Brunhilde and Revenge of Krumhilde.





The following photos are of St. Peter's Cathedral where the edict against Martin Luther was read.

















              
Not far from the Cathedral resides a Medieval Jewish Cemetery.










Part of the wall surrounding the cemetery.


After biking over three hours across dirt roads to get to Worms we then got to bike across cobbled stones as we toured the town.  Were my legs tired?  Not at all.  Was something else a wee bit sore?  You don't even know...












We barely had time to recover that evening before we jumped on our bikes the next morning and pedaled to Heidelberg via Mannheim.  Until then!

2 comments:

  1. Taking such a bike tour seems like such a great way to visit a lace.

    I do not know much about architecture but those buildings look so beautiful and impressive. With such scenery and history, Worms looks like such a nice place to
    visit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Brian! The architecture is astounding. You could look and look at those buildings for the rest of your life and still not see everything. That men dedicated their lives to create works of such magnitude boggle the mind.

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